Book Launch, What’s Up, Cards, and Happithoughts

It’s official, finally! The book is out! 42 Rules for Working Moms launches this week. I’ve had a chance to skim over it, and honestly, what a group of women! We’re from all over the place, married, single, highly educated or not, all sorts of backgrounds. Pretty darned cool if you ask me! Should you pick it up, my rule is #34: Observe the Peace. Watching little ones sleep can be a centering experience, a calming end to the day, a reminder of what is really important, and one heck of a happy fix.

If you’d like to know more (like where to buy it!), feel free to contact me here, or go to http://www.42rules.com/working_moms/

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I haven’t been writing much of late because there’s something that’s bothering me. Something I need to deal with inside my own head, and it’s something I’m not really ready to write about. Not in a public forum like this. I have a big regret. And this regret is starting to affect my reactions to some topics. But I don’t like living my life with any regrets, particularly one like this. So it’s just something I need to accept and move on from. This isn’t an easy thing to do though.

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News item today on the news radio station I wake up to. Something about the obvious bias against fathers in the card industry. I’d thought something similar when searching for Father’s Day cards earlier this week. This is something fairly new for me, as I’m just not a card-sending kind of person, but I need to shape up on that front. I like receiving cards. It makes me feel special. If my family missed my birthday I’d feel hurt. I know cards make other people feel special too. So … leap of logic here, I don’t like being the type of person who doesn’t send cards. But all of that is beside the point.

It was hard to find nice Fathers Day cards. Really hard! Roughly three quarters had a fat slob in his undershirt and shorts scratching himself on a couch, yelling for a beer while he watched TV. Most of the rest had golf jokes. Or variations on a dad on all fours on a skateboard, kid riding on his back, kid squealing with glee for Daddy to fart again. Nice representation of fatherhood, eh? I got all grouchy about the card industry, portraying fathers as useless or intestinally distressed. Cameron’s father hasn’t polluted my mental image of fathers, I have two excellent, strong, wonderful father-figures (Dad and Bill) in my family to counter his example.

But as I lay in bed, half-dozing still, listening to this report I decided that this was ludicrous. The card industry is a reflection of society. They’re trying to make money. If flowery prose and poetry sold Father’s Day cards you can bet your hiney they’d make them. A lot of them! The available selection of cards is the result of careful market research into what will sell. It’s not that we (in the society meaning of the word) think fathers are like that. It’s that we buy cards like that because that’s what we are led to believe, rightly or not, that guys want to be given. I’m also willing to bet that the slimmer pickings and fewer cards in general compared with Mothers Day cards is because fewer people buy Fathers Day cards. We’re raised to think that real guys don’t want sentimental poetry, flattering thoughts, overt heartfelt thank yous in the same way women do, so we don’t go buy the men in our lives cards with those things. Instead, we buy fart jokes. Because that’s what men appreciate, right?

I don’t think Hallmark is to blame at all for this one.

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Okay, happy thoughts time. I’m starting to feel a little like I need it.
• Cameron. Let’s start with him. He’s so determined to walk on his own that he makes me smile even when I’m ready to scream at him. We walked … I don’t know how far today. Book store to London Drugs to home. Far. Every fricking ten feet he found something to stop and do, something he had to do again and again and again and again. But he was determined. Poor little guy, he didn’t get to buy the random things he said he wanted to buy, then I wouldn’t let him explore his world on the way home.
• Okay, I’m going to cheat. Another one about Cameron. He picks flowers for me – today, a wee bouquet of buttercups from the roadside.
• My kitchen is clean. So is my living room.
• I applied for two jobs today.
• It was sunny! And we met some down-the-street neighbours with a fifteen month old son, Pierson. I think I spelled that right. Might be Peirson. They were clear, not the same spelling as in Lester B. Had a nice chat with them while we walked – they’ve lived in the area for a few years, she’s a new prof at SFU, he’s an investment banker. And while I remember their son’s name … I cannot for the life of me recall their names. Oh well.

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One response to “Book Launch, What’s Up, Cards, and Happithoughts

  1. Oh, I don’t like to see you sad. I’m here if you want to talk about it.

    I went to the B&N website and found your book there! I’m so excited, I’m definitely getting it! Now when you become famous, I can tell everyone that I know you!

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