A New Species of Frog

The Living Room Frog is a little known species found, to the best of my knowledge, only in a few isolated locations within the city of Vancouver. Their exact population size is unknown, varying from lots to a few, but they do seem to be found in groups of three. They are adept at hiding, but sometimes you just have to look in the right way and you’ll find one. They hide under cushions, in the couch, under the rug, and in lampshades. When venturing outside, they like to hide under leaves, with rocks, and in the cracks of sidewalks. However, they are easily scared, and prefer above all else to hide in the comfort of familiarity – in a Mommy’s Purse.

They are small, only around a 3 year old’s handful, and are typically green. Like other frogs, they say “ribbit,” but you have to listen closely to hear them. I hypothesize that the Living Room Frog’s vocalizations are within that range of hearing lost to anyone over around 18, higher pitched than a mosquito’s (or preschooler’s) whine. They are quite active, and can jump quickly from one place to another, thus avoiding being caught by those of us who can’t quite see them. Their diet is still unobserved, although it is possible that they appreciate chewing gum, as Cameron feels it his duty to warn them to not eat mine while they hide in my purse.

As of yet, these diurnal critters appear to be friendly and non-threatening. As far as I can tell, the Living Room Frog is like other frogs, and lacks teeth, but given that I suspect they are related to Tad, Lily and Leap (the frogs from the Leapfrog children’s toys), who have big white-toothed smiles, it is entirely possible that they share similar dentition to humans. The good news is that the Leapfrog family’s teeth are not sharp.

They like to be kissed.

I wish I could post a picture of one, but they are exceptionally difficult to capture on film.

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One response to “A New Species of Frog

  1. Pingback: The Elephants Join In « One in 36 Million·

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